Grieving and stages of Grief. What is it?

Loss can be very stressful and take a physical toll on your body.

Posted by Avail Content
19 days ago

Grief is a natural response to losing someone or something that’s important to you. You may feel a variety of emotions, including anger, sadness, or loneliness. You can experience grief for different reasons. Maybe a loved one died, a relationship ended, or you lost your job. Other life changes such as a chronic illness or moving to a new home can also lead to grief.

Everyone grieves differently. But if you understand your emotions, take care of yourself, and seek support, you can heal.

Grief can affect your nervous system as well as weaken your immune system.

Grief symptoms can include:


  • Tiredness
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Upset stomach
  • Joint pain
  • Weak muscles
  • Tightness in your throat or chest
  • Loss of appetite or increased appetite
  • Sleeping too much or too little

Emotional symptoms

When you’re grieving, it’s common to feel emotions in waves. There are no right or wrong feelings in grieving. You may feel normal one minute but be in tears the next. You also may have conflicting or confusing emotions, such as:


  • Feeling sad that a loved one died but also a sense of relief that they’re not in pain.
  • Missing your spouse after divorce but also feeling happy about a new start.
  • Having guilt for being glad as you no longer have to take care of a dying loved one.
  • Feeling apathy, anger, sadness, and regret, all at the same time, as you grieve the loss of someone with whom you had a difficult relationship.

What’s a grief trigger?

It’s a sudden reminder of a loved one who died or something you lost. It can bring strong emotions. These triggers can include songs, places, smells, sounds, and special occasions. They’re most common in the first weeks and months after a loss, but they can happen later too.


How Long Does Grief Last?

There’s no correct amount of time to grieve. Your grieving process depends on a number of things such as your personality, age, beliefs, and support network. The type of loss is also a factor. For example, chances are you’ll grieve longer and harder over the sudden death of a loved one than, say, the end of a romatic relationship

With time, grief symptoms will usually ease. You’ll be able to feel happiness and joy along with grief. You’ll be able to return to your daily life.

Coping With Grief

Grief counseling

A therapist can help you explore your emotions. They can also teach you coping skills and help you manage your grief. If you’re depressed, a doctor may be able to prescribe medicines to help you feel better.

hen you’re in deep, emotional pain, it can be tempting to try to numb your feelings with drugs, alcohol, food, or even work. But be careful. These are temporary escapes that won’t make you heal faster or feel better in the long run. In fact, they can lead to addiction, depression, anxiety, or even an emotional breakdown.

Instead, try these things to help you come to terms with your loss and begin to heal:


  • Give yourself time. Accept your feelings and know that grieving is a process.
  • Talk to others. Spend time with friends and family. Don’t isolate yourself.
  • Take care of yourself. Exercise regularly, eat well, and get enough sleep to stay healthy and energized.
  • Return to your hobbies. Get back to the activities that bring you joy.
  • Join a support group. Speak with others who are also grieving. It can help you feel more connected.

For full article refer to Zilpah Sheikh, MD

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Grieving and stages of Grief. What is it?

Last updated 19 days ago

Grief is a natural response to losing someone or something that’s important to you. You may feel a variety of emotions, including anger, sadness, or loneliness. You can experience grief for different reasons. Maybe a loved one died, a relationship ended, or you lost your job. Other life changes such as a chronic illness or moving to a new home can also lead to grief.

Everyone grieves differently. But if you understand your emotions, take care of yourself, and seek support, you can heal.

Grief can affect your nervous system as well as weaken your immune system.

Grief symptoms can include:


  • Tiredness
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Upset stomach
  • Joint pain
  • Weak muscles
  • Tightness in your throat or chest
  • Loss of appetite or increased appetite
  • Sleeping too much or too little

Emotional symptoms

When you’re grieving, it’s common to feel emotions in waves. There are no right or wrong feelings in grieving. You may feel normal one minute but be in tears the next. You also may have conflicting or confusing emotions, such as:


  • Feeling sad that a loved one died but also a sense of relief that they’re not in pain.
  • Missing your spouse after divorce but also feeling happy about a new start.
  • Having guilt for being glad as you no longer have to take care of a dying loved one.
  • Feeling apathy, anger, sadness, and regret, all at the same time, as you grieve the loss of someone with whom you had a difficult relationship.

What’s a grief trigger?

It’s a sudden reminder of a loved one who died or something you lost. It can bring strong emotions. These triggers can include songs, places, smells, sounds, and special occasions. They’re most common in the first weeks and months after a loss, but they can happen later too.


How Long Does Grief Last?

There’s no correct amount of time to grieve. Your grieving process depends on a number of things such as your personality, age, beliefs, and support network. The type of loss is also a factor. For example, chances are you’ll grieve longer and harder over the sudden death of a loved one than, say, the end of a romatic relationship

With time, grief symptoms will usually ease. You’ll be able to feel happiness and joy along with grief. You’ll be able to return to your daily life.

Coping With Grief

Grief counseling

A therapist can help you explore your emotions. They can also teach you coping skills and help you manage your grief. If you’re depressed, a doctor may be able to prescribe medicines to help you feel better.

hen you’re in deep, emotional pain, it can be tempting to try to numb your feelings with drugs, alcohol, food, or even work. But be careful. These are temporary escapes that won’t make you heal faster or feel better in the long run. In fact, they can lead to addiction, depression, anxiety, or even an emotional breakdown.

Instead, try these things to help you come to terms with your loss and begin to heal:


  • Give yourself time. Accept your feelings and know that grieving is a process.
  • Talk to others. Spend time with friends and family. Don’t isolate yourself.
  • Take care of yourself. Exercise regularly, eat well, and get enough sleep to stay healthy and energized.
  • Return to your hobbies. Get back to the activities that bring you joy.
  • Join a support group. Speak with others who are also grieving. It can help you feel more connected.

For full article refer to Zilpah Sheikh, MD