Staying Socially Active In Retirement

Staying socially active when you retire can be a challenge. You may have had a strong support network through your workplace, but what happens when you no longer see coworkers on a daily basis?

Posted by Avail Content
1 year ago

Staying Socially Active In Retirement

Staying socially active in retirement is a key to your happiness and fulfillment. Research has even shown that frequent interactions with family and friends or volunteering can delay or prevent many age-related changes (e.g., memory loss).

Staying socially active when you retire can be a challenge. You may have had a strong support network through your workplace, but what happens when you no longer see coworkers on a daily basis? What happens if you decide to live abroad? How will you see your friends when you can no longer drive yourself or get around independently?

Since loneliness and isolation are major threats to your happiness in retirement, make sure you work hard at reaching out and connecting with others and that you plan for the impact that retirement may have on your social network. Here are some tips:

  • Connect regularly with friends and family. Spend time with the people you enjoy and who make you feel upbeat. Even if you aren’t able to visit in person, call or write or e-mail them to keep your relationships fresh and current.
  • Put effort into making new friends. Make it a point to befriend people, including people who are younger than you (younger friends can energize you and help you see life from a new perspective).
  • Spend time with at least one person every day. You shouldn’t be alone day after day.
  • One of the best ways to feel accomplished and useful is through volunteering. Researchers have found that happy people tend to participate more in community organizations, are more liked by others, are less likely to get divorced and tend to live longer. As well, they tend to be less self-focused, more loving, more energetic, and less vulnerable to diseases and premature death.

Think about the following:

  1. Which people or groups do you want to stay in touch with during your retirement?
  2. For each of the people or groups who you have identified, what are five ways you can keep these relationships strong and solid?

Learn More

For more information about planning retirement, the following sites may be helpful.

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Staying Socially Active In Retirement

Last updated 1 year ago

Staying Socially Active In Retirement

Staying socially active in retirement is a key to your happiness and fulfillment. Research has even shown that frequent interactions with family and friends or volunteering can delay or prevent many age-related changes (e.g., memory loss).

Staying socially active when you retire can be a challenge. You may have had a strong support network through your workplace, but what happens when you no longer see coworkers on a daily basis? What happens if you decide to live abroad? How will you see your friends when you can no longer drive yourself or get around independently?

Since loneliness and isolation are major threats to your happiness in retirement, make sure you work hard at reaching out and connecting with others and that you plan for the impact that retirement may have on your social network. Here are some tips:

  • Connect regularly with friends and family. Spend time with the people you enjoy and who make you feel upbeat. Even if you aren’t able to visit in person, call or write or e-mail them to keep your relationships fresh and current.
  • Put effort into making new friends. Make it a point to befriend people, including people who are younger than you (younger friends can energize you and help you see life from a new perspective).
  • Spend time with at least one person every day. You shouldn’t be alone day after day.
  • One of the best ways to feel accomplished and useful is through volunteering. Researchers have found that happy people tend to participate more in community organizations, are more liked by others, are less likely to get divorced and tend to live longer. As well, they tend to be less self-focused, more loving, more energetic, and less vulnerable to diseases and premature death.

Think about the following:

  1. Which people or groups do you want to stay in touch with during your retirement?
  2. For each of the people or groups who you have identified, what are five ways you can keep these relationships strong and solid?

Learn More

For more information about planning retirement, the following sites may be helpful.