Tips for managing chronic pain

There is no single cure for chronic pain. It takes a team approach and involves medical management, movement therapy and learning specific coping strategies.

Posted by Avail Content
6 months ago

Certain factors can magnify the experience of pain, including:


  • Stressful life experiences
  • Mental health issues, including depression, anxiety and social isolation
  • Decreased ability to do the things you enjoy doing
  • Overexertion or underexertion

No diagnostic test can show your pain level. It’s a subjective, individual experience. Your health care team may ask you to rate your pain level on a scale of 0–10 to help evaluate and document your symptoms.


Coping strategies


There is no single cure for chronic pain. It takes a team approach and involves medical management, movement therapy and learning specific coping strategies.


Let’s review some of those strategies:


  • Practice breathing exercises.
    Inhale slowly through the nose, allow your lungs and belly to expand, then exhale slowly through your mouth and nose.

  • Get moving.
    Work with a physical or occupational therapist on appropriate exercises or tai chi.

  • Participate in meaningful activities.
    The body’s natural, feel-good chemicals, called endorphins, are activated by exercise, relaxation techniques and enjoyable experiences. Set aside time each day for a simple activity that is calming or brings you joy.

  • Engage in mindfulness.
    Meditation does not have to be fancy or complicated. Allow yourself to focus on the present moment, letting go of any interpretation or judgment. To start, try paying attention to one sensory input at a time, such as hearing or vision.

  • Use moderation and pacing.
    Set realistic goals and start by doing one-third of what you think you can do. For more difficult tasks, try setting a timer to remind yourself to take a break.

  • Practice good sleep habits.
    Establish regular bed and wake times. Use your bed for sleep and sex only. Do not spend your day there.

  • Eliminate unhelpful substances.
    Smoking restricts blood flow, which prevents healing. Alcohol creates nerve damage over time.

  • Treat related conditions.
    Cognitive behavioral therapy with a licensed mental health professional helps decrease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other mental and physical health concerns.

  • Stay connected to your support system
    While it’s important to take time for yourself, having family and friends that care about you is important. Although you may want to be left alone during bouts of chronic pain, lean in to support from others.

These self-management tools, along with the appropriate use of over-the-counter and prescription medications, can help reduce the effects of persistent pain.

If you have difficulty with pain, speak with your health care team regarding a comprehensive pain treatment plan to help put you back in control of your life.


Monica Foster, Ph.D., Wisconsin.*

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Tips for managing chronic pain

Last updated 6 months ago

Certain factors can magnify the experience of pain, including:


  • Stressful life experiences
  • Mental health issues, including depression, anxiety and social isolation
  • Decreased ability to do the things you enjoy doing
  • Overexertion or underexertion

No diagnostic test can show your pain level. It’s a subjective, individual experience. Your health care team may ask you to rate your pain level on a scale of 0–10 to help evaluate and document your symptoms.


Coping strategies


There is no single cure for chronic pain. It takes a team approach and involves medical management, movement therapy and learning specific coping strategies.


Let’s review some of those strategies:


  • Practice breathing exercises.
    Inhale slowly through the nose, allow your lungs and belly to expand, then exhale slowly through your mouth and nose.

  • Get moving.
    Work with a physical or occupational therapist on appropriate exercises or tai chi.

  • Participate in meaningful activities.
    The body’s natural, feel-good chemicals, called endorphins, are activated by exercise, relaxation techniques and enjoyable experiences. Set aside time each day for a simple activity that is calming or brings you joy.

  • Engage in mindfulness.
    Meditation does not have to be fancy or complicated. Allow yourself to focus on the present moment, letting go of any interpretation or judgment. To start, try paying attention to one sensory input at a time, such as hearing or vision.

  • Use moderation and pacing.
    Set realistic goals and start by doing one-third of what you think you can do. For more difficult tasks, try setting a timer to remind yourself to take a break.

  • Practice good sleep habits.
    Establish regular bed and wake times. Use your bed for sleep and sex only. Do not spend your day there.

  • Eliminate unhelpful substances.
    Smoking restricts blood flow, which prevents healing. Alcohol creates nerve damage over time.

  • Treat related conditions.
    Cognitive behavioral therapy with a licensed mental health professional helps decrease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and other mental and physical health concerns.

  • Stay connected to your support system
    While it’s important to take time for yourself, having family and friends that care about you is important. Although you may want to be left alone during bouts of chronic pain, lean in to support from others.

These self-management tools, along with the appropriate use of over-the-counter and prescription medications, can help reduce the effects of persistent pain.

If you have difficulty with pain, speak with your health care team regarding a comprehensive pain treatment plan to help put you back in control of your life.


Monica Foster, Ph.D., Wisconsin.*