Causes of Anxiety

Anxiety Series – Article 3

Publié par Avail Content
il y a 7 mois

The Flight or fight response can still sometimes be lifesaving when meeting a real danger. Nowadays, however, the reasons we feel anxious are not usually life-threatening and are more likely to be situations, such as: getting stuck in a traffic jam, going for an interview, sitting an exam or running late for a meeting.


These everyday experiences can trigger the same automatic response and we react and feel as if we’re in real physical danger. Everyone will face stressful situations like these and feel anxious from time to time. Usually, the feelings pass once the situation is over. Sometimes, however, anxiety can be more severe and go on for longer.


You may be having a stressful time in your life such as going through a bereavement, relationship problems, work or money worries or becoming a parent. Sometimes it can be hard to know what’s causing your anxiety which can be frustrating and upsetting in itself. Some people are naturally more cautious or thoughtful and may be more likely to feel anxious and worry more.


Some symptoms of anxiety or low mood can have an underlying physical health cause including problems like thyroid dysfunction, too little or too much calcium, severe vitamin B12 deficiency and severe anemia.


It’s also possible that an upsetting or traumatic life experience, whether recent or in the past, can be linked to feelings of anxiety. A past experience can make you more anxious about bad things happening again. Early experiences (particularly under the age of 3) can also be a factor. Children who feel fear more often, don’t feel protected or experience disruption like parents’ separation or moving schools are more likely to experience anxiety as adults. And a child who sees a parent constantly worrying may learn this behavior and worry more as an adult.



                                                                                                       Next to when can Anxiety become a problem?

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Causes of Anxiety

Dernière mise à jour il y a 7 mois

The Flight or fight response can still sometimes be lifesaving when meeting a real danger. Nowadays, however, the reasons we feel anxious are not usually life-threatening and are more likely to be situations, such as: getting stuck in a traffic jam, going for an interview, sitting an exam or running late for a meeting.


These everyday experiences can trigger the same automatic response and we react and feel as if we’re in real physical danger. Everyone will face stressful situations like these and feel anxious from time to time. Usually, the feelings pass once the situation is over. Sometimes, however, anxiety can be more severe and go on for longer.


You may be having a stressful time in your life such as going through a bereavement, relationship problems, work or money worries or becoming a parent. Sometimes it can be hard to know what’s causing your anxiety which can be frustrating and upsetting in itself. Some people are naturally more cautious or thoughtful and may be more likely to feel anxious and worry more.


Some symptoms of anxiety or low mood can have an underlying physical health cause including problems like thyroid dysfunction, too little or too much calcium, severe vitamin B12 deficiency and severe anemia.


It’s also possible that an upsetting or traumatic life experience, whether recent or in the past, can be linked to feelings of anxiety. A past experience can make you more anxious about bad things happening again. Early experiences (particularly under the age of 3) can also be a factor. Children who feel fear more often, don’t feel protected or experience disruption like parents’ separation or moving schools are more likely to experience anxiety as adults. And a child who sees a parent constantly worrying may learn this behavior and worry more as an adult.



                                                                                                       Next to when can Anxiety become a problem?