Workplace Strategies for Employees - Mental Health

Change is not easy, and is sometimes outside of our control at work.

Posted by Avail Content
1 month ago

Coping with change


Change is not easy, and is sometimes outside of our control at work. Team members leave or get promoted, economies fluctuate and put new pressure on organizations, sales ebb and flow, leaders change strategic direction, etc. 

Techniques for navigating transitions or unexpected shifts at work include:

  • Accepting change is a normal part of work
  • Focusing on what you can control and looking for opportunities within change
  • Setting realistic expectations
  • Leaning on support systems and managers for direction

Dealing with stress and burnout


Workplaces can create and manage the conditions for stress and burnout, but recognizing the signs of burnout and taking the time to rest and rejuvenate is a responsibility of the individual, too. 

For example, employers set policies around vacation time and breaks, and it’s the employees’ part to truly disconnect during break times.

Techniques include:

  • Learn to recognize the signs of burnout, including feeling depleted, consistently negative or cynical, or having difficulty completing tasks
  • Take breaks and vacations regularly
  • Avoid work in off hours and weekends, and communicate openly with your employer if work is not manageable in a workday
  • Identify, establish, and communicate boundaries with your colleagues (e.g. telling them your work hours and outside-of-work commitments)
  • Celebrate achievements regularly—even small ones—to maintain momentum and motivation

Communicating Effectively


Difficult conversations are a part of every workplace. Learning how to communicate openly, and advocate for oneself is a technique to help manage and prevent stress, burnout, and emotional distress. Open communication can also lead to more solutions and problem-solving.

Techniques include:

  • Being consistent in messaging and expectations with colleagues, supervisors, team members
  • Using “I” statements to express feelings and avoiding expressing concern by blaming others
  • Being an active listener for others, and seeking clarification if something is unclear
  • Providing and asking for constructive feedback
  • Bringing concerns up earlybefore they become issues
  • Becoming an advocate for mental health care in the workplace

Personal Growth and Self Care


Personal growth and self-care can go hand-in-hand. Prioritizing physical and mental resilience can improve mental health with work.

Techniques include:

  • Engage in regular non-work relaxing or energizing activities like reading, exercising, walking outdoors, making time to socialize with friends
  • Prioritizing a healthy diet and exercise regimen
  • Taking regular breaks, including mindfulness practices can keep you grounded in the present moment, and meditation practices can help alleviate stress and calm the body
  • Look for training, development or skill-building opportunities, ask for feedback and coaching from managers and colleagues

Seeking Help (form a therapist)


Therapy can be a crucial resource for an overall healthy relationship with work. It can be proactive for growth and self development, or to build resilience to handle challenges before they become a problem. 

It can also help if you notice signs that you may be struggling with your mental health, including persistent sadness, changes in sleep patterns, mood changes, difficulty concentrating, or physical body tension. 

When these challenges start affecting your daily life or your relationships with others (colleagues or at home), and don’t go away for weeks or months at a time, consider reviewing your workplace mental health benefits for mental health support options, or looking for a therapist on your own. 

Some people may find certain workplace strategies for mental health more effective than others. Some people might also find certain environments or types of work highly energizing and motivating, while for others the same kind of work can be demotivating and stressful. Be careful not to compare yourself to others at work. 

Consider your personal needs, don’t be afraid to reach out for help navigating mental health challenges. Working with a mental health professional can help you build mental health skills for the workplace that will help you thrive to reach new potential and your goals.

Written by Rosa Park
Professionally verified by Arunie Saldhi
For Full article refer to FS - First Session

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Workplace Strategies for Employees - Mental Health

Last updated 1 month ago

Coping with change


Change is not easy, and is sometimes outside of our control at work. Team members leave or get promoted, economies fluctuate and put new pressure on organizations, sales ebb and flow, leaders change strategic direction, etc. 

Techniques for navigating transitions or unexpected shifts at work include:

  • Accepting change is a normal part of work
  • Focusing on what you can control and looking for opportunities within change
  • Setting realistic expectations
  • Leaning on support systems and managers for direction

Dealing with stress and burnout


Workplaces can create and manage the conditions for stress and burnout, but recognizing the signs of burnout and taking the time to rest and rejuvenate is a responsibility of the individual, too. 

For example, employers set policies around vacation time and breaks, and it’s the employees’ part to truly disconnect during break times.

Techniques include:

  • Learn to recognize the signs of burnout, including feeling depleted, consistently negative or cynical, or having difficulty completing tasks
  • Take breaks and vacations regularly
  • Avoid work in off hours and weekends, and communicate openly with your employer if work is not manageable in a workday
  • Identify, establish, and communicate boundaries with your colleagues (e.g. telling them your work hours and outside-of-work commitments)
  • Celebrate achievements regularly—even small ones—to maintain momentum and motivation

Communicating Effectively


Difficult conversations are a part of every workplace. Learning how to communicate openly, and advocate for oneself is a technique to help manage and prevent stress, burnout, and emotional distress. Open communication can also lead to more solutions and problem-solving.

Techniques include:

  • Being consistent in messaging and expectations with colleagues, supervisors, team members
  • Using “I” statements to express feelings and avoiding expressing concern by blaming others
  • Being an active listener for others, and seeking clarification if something is unclear
  • Providing and asking for constructive feedback
  • Bringing concerns up earlybefore they become issues
  • Becoming an advocate for mental health care in the workplace

Personal Growth and Self Care


Personal growth and self-care can go hand-in-hand. Prioritizing physical and mental resilience can improve mental health with work.

Techniques include:

  • Engage in regular non-work relaxing or energizing activities like reading, exercising, walking outdoors, making time to socialize with friends
  • Prioritizing a healthy diet and exercise regimen
  • Taking regular breaks, including mindfulness practices can keep you grounded in the present moment, and meditation practices can help alleviate stress and calm the body
  • Look for training, development or skill-building opportunities, ask for feedback and coaching from managers and colleagues

Seeking Help (form a therapist)


Therapy can be a crucial resource for an overall healthy relationship with work. It can be proactive for growth and self development, or to build resilience to handle challenges before they become a problem. 

It can also help if you notice signs that you may be struggling with your mental health, including persistent sadness, changes in sleep patterns, mood changes, difficulty concentrating, or physical body tension. 

When these challenges start affecting your daily life or your relationships with others (colleagues or at home), and don’t go away for weeks or months at a time, consider reviewing your workplace mental health benefits for mental health support options, or looking for a therapist on your own. 

Some people may find certain workplace strategies for mental health more effective than others. Some people might also find certain environments or types of work highly energizing and motivating, while for others the same kind of work can be demotivating and stressful. Be careful not to compare yourself to others at work. 

Consider your personal needs, don’t be afraid to reach out for help navigating mental health challenges. Working with a mental health professional can help you build mental health skills for the workplace that will help you thrive to reach new potential and your goals.

Written by Rosa Park
Professionally verified by Arunie Saldhi
For Full article refer to FS - First Session