Exercises for back pain

The best way to deal with back pain is to stay active and continue doing regular exercise.

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il y a 1 an

Exercises for back pain

In addition to pain medications that you you may obtain over-the counter (e.g. Aspirin, Ibuprofen) or that your family doctor may prescribe, you can play an active role in finding relief from back pain. Where do you start? Exercise!

Exercise and back pain may sound like the worst of bedmates, butresearchers have learned a great deal about pain and its physiological and psychological basis, leading to pain management treatments that include a controlled, gradual exercise program that is tailored to your needs.

Staying active means continuing with regular day-to-day activities to avoid becoming sedentary.
Examples include walking to the shops rather than taking the car, getting off the bus a stop early, gardening, and taking the dog for a walk.

If you experience mild pain, you’re advised to take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen, available from any pharmacy.

Your pharmacist can advise on which medication is best for you, depending on your personal circumstances.

Exercises and activities

If your back pain is mild, try to exercise as well as maintaining an active lifestyle. You can do any activity that gives your body a good workout.

When choosing an activity, pick something you enjoy – that way, you’re more likely to stick with it.
Ideally, your choice of activities should involve elements of endurance, as well as strength and flexibility. And aim to gradually increase your backflexibility and restoring normal motion. Good examples include  water therapy (exercising in water), stretching exercises, gentle aerobic routines and many
others.

There’s also some evidence that regular yoga and pilates is beneficial for people with lower back pain but since many of the more advanced movements in yoga and pilates can put strain on the back, be very careful about what you attempt to do, never continue a movement if it causes pain, and be sure to advise your instructor of your situation.

Other options:

Manual therapy

Your family doctor may suggest combining an exercise programme with a course of manual therapy, such as massage or physiotherapy.

Manual therapy is a type of physiotherapy. It’s especially helpful if your back is stiff and flexibility is an issue.

Psychological therapy

Your family doctor may also suggest a treatment package that combines an exercise programme and manual therapy and a course of psychological therapy.

This can help you understand your thoughts, feelings and actions. You’ll learn techniques to alter the way you react to and cope with things, such as pain.

Psychological therapy won’t necessarily make your lower back pain go away. But it may make it less intense and help you get back to work and doing your daily activities.

Note:

If you experience back pain and are using any type of over-the-counter medication, be certain to discuss this with your family doctor. Certain medications may cause potentially dangerous interactions with other medications you may be taking, or there may be a pre-existing health condition you have that contraindicates your taking a certain type of medication, even if it something you can buy without prescription.

Learn More

For more information about managing back pain, the following sources may be helpful.

Note:

The contents on Avail such as text, graphics, images, and information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any other website.

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Exercises for back pain

Dernière mise à jour il y a 1 an

Exercises for back pain

In addition to pain medications that you you may obtain over-the counter (e.g. Aspirin, Ibuprofen) or that your family doctor may prescribe, you can play an active role in finding relief from back pain. Where do you start? Exercise!

Exercise and back pain may sound like the worst of bedmates, butresearchers have learned a great deal about pain and its physiological and psychological basis, leading to pain management treatments that include a controlled, gradual exercise program that is tailored to your needs.

Staying active means continuing with regular day-to-day activities to avoid becoming sedentary.
Examples include walking to the shops rather than taking the car, getting off the bus a stop early, gardening, and taking the dog for a walk.

If you experience mild pain, you’re advised to take a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, such as ibuprofen, available from any pharmacy.

Your pharmacist can advise on which medication is best for you, depending on your personal circumstances.

Exercises and activities

If your back pain is mild, try to exercise as well as maintaining an active lifestyle. You can do any activity that gives your body a good workout.

When choosing an activity, pick something you enjoy – that way, you’re more likely to stick with it.
Ideally, your choice of activities should involve elements of endurance, as well as strength and flexibility. And aim to gradually increase your backflexibility and restoring normal motion. Good examples include  water therapy (exercising in water), stretching exercises, gentle aerobic routines and many
others.

There’s also some evidence that regular yoga and pilates is beneficial for people with lower back pain but since many of the more advanced movements in yoga and pilates can put strain on the back, be very careful about what you attempt to do, never continue a movement if it causes pain, and be sure to advise your instructor of your situation.

Other options:

Manual therapy

Your family doctor may suggest combining an exercise programme with a course of manual therapy, such as massage or physiotherapy.

Manual therapy is a type of physiotherapy. It’s especially helpful if your back is stiff and flexibility is an issue.

Psychological therapy

Your family doctor may also suggest a treatment package that combines an exercise programme and manual therapy and a course of psychological therapy.

This can help you understand your thoughts, feelings and actions. You’ll learn techniques to alter the way you react to and cope with things, such as pain.

Psychological therapy won’t necessarily make your lower back pain go away. But it may make it less intense and help you get back to work and doing your daily activities.

Note:

If you experience back pain and are using any type of over-the-counter medication, be certain to discuss this with your family doctor. Certain medications may cause potentially dangerous interactions with other medications you may be taking, or there may be a pre-existing health condition you have that contraindicates your taking a certain type of medication, even if it something you can buy without prescription.

Learn More

For more information about managing back pain, the following sources may be helpful.

Note:

The contents on Avail such as text, graphics, images, and information is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any other website.